Bowl

The bowl is hammered and turned brass, chased and inlaid with silver, gold and a black organic material. It is decorated with a wide band of thuluth inscriptions interrupted by four medallions.

Decorative kufic letters are interspersed in the vertical shafts of the thuluth inscription.

The four medallions represent a central personage seated on a throne, flanked by two standing attendants who hold maces (?). Blossoms appear under the throne in three medallions whereas a duck is depicted in the fourth scene.

Gold inlay has been applied to the face, hat, and garments of the prince; it also appears on the faces, hats, and maces of the attendants.

The bottom of the bowl has a radiating design forming sixteen units filled with floral motifs. The interior is devoid of decoration.

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Historical period(s)
mid 14th century
Medium
Brass, inlaid with silver, gold and a black organic material
Dimensions
H x W x D: 12 x 23 x 23 cm (4 3/4 x 9 1/16 x 9 1/16 in)
Geography
Iran, Fars
Credit Line
Purchase — Charles Lang Freer Endowment
Collection
Freer Gallery of Art Collection
Accession Number
F1980.25
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Metalwork, Vessel
Type

Bowl

Keywords
flower, Iran, kufic script, sultan, thuluth script
Provenance
Provenance research underway.
Description

The bowl is hammered and turned brass, chased and inlaid with silver, gold and a black organic material. It is decorated with a wide band of thuluth inscriptions interrupted by four medallions.

Decorative kufic letters are interspersed in the vertical shafts of the thuluth inscription.

The four medallions represent a central personage seated on a throne, flanked by two standing attendants who hold maces (?). Blossoms appear under the throne in three medallions whereas a duck is depicted in the fourth scene.

Gold inlay has been applied to the face, hat, and garments of the prince; it also appears on the faces, hats, and maces of the attendants.

The bottom of the bowl has a radiating design forming sixteen units filled with floral motifs. The interior is devoid of decoration.

Inscription(s)

1. (E. Atil, 1981) . . . The inscriptions, written in Arabic, read: "Glory to our master, the great sultan, lord of the guardians (riqab) of nations, the sultan of sultans of the Arabs and Persians, the wise . . . " (^o^.)

2. (Glenn Lowry, exhibition label, "Metalwork," October 1985) . . . The inscription reads: "Glory to our master, the greatest sultan, lord of the necks of nations, the sultan of sultans of the Arabs and non-Arabs, the wise-king (?)."

3. (Wheeler Thackston, Harvard University, Summer 1990) The inscription reads (^o^):

al-'izz li-mawlana al-[su]tan * [a]l-a'zam malik riqab al-umam * al-sultan al-salatin [sic, read sultan salatin] al-'arab wa'l-'ajam, al-'alim

Glory to our lord the most magnificent sultan, lord of the necks of the nations, sultan of the sultans of the Arabs and Persians, the learned . . .

Published References
  • Mr. Yanni Petsopoulos. Tulips, Arabesques, and Turbans: Decorative Arts from the Ottoman Empire. New York and London. pp. 37, 44, pl. 22.
  • Dr. Esin Atil, W. Thomas Chase, Paul Jett. Islamic Metalwork in the Freer Gallery of Art. Washington, 1985. cat. 21, pp. 162-166.
Collection Area(s)
Arts of the Islamic World
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
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